Why little black books instead of phones and computers

Originally posted on The Story's Story:

“Despite being a denizen of the digital world, or maybe because he knew too well its isolating potential, Jobs was a strong believer in face-to-face meetings.” That’s from Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs. It’s a strange way to begin a post about notebooks, but Jobs’ views on the power of a potentially anachronistic practice applies to other seemingly anachronistic practices. I’m a believer in notebooks, though I’m hardly a luddite and use a computer too much.

The notebook has an immediate tactile advantage over phones: they aren’t connected to the Internet. It’s intimate in a way computers aren’t. A notebook has never interrupted me with a screen that says, “Wuz up?” Notebooks are easy to use without thinking. I know where I have everything I’ve written on-the-go over the last eight years: in the same stack. It’s easy to draw on paper. I don’t have to manage files…

View original 1,534 more words

Agency is Agency, No Matter What It Wears

Originally posted on Smoke & Stir:

By Taylor Marvin

At The American Prospect E.J, Graff has a thought-provoking piece on rape culture in the US and abroad. If Americans are tempted to view the horrific torture, rape, and murder of a New Delhi woman as evidence that rape culture is endemic only to foreign societies, they’re wrong; in Graff’s words, rape culture “lives anywhere that has a ‘traditional’ vision of women’s sexuality.” This, of course, includes the US, where slut-shaming is epidemic, politicians restrict their sympathy for survivors of “legitimate” rape, and all too many people continue to blame rape survivors for being the victim of crimes.

Graff makes her argument in graphic detail, and her piece is well worth reading. However, one troubling line jumps out:

“A culture in which women must cover up or be threatened is a rape culture. You’re thinking of hijab and burquas, right? Think also of the now well-known SlutWalks, which were launched after…

View original 543 more words

Why little black books instead of phones and computers

Originally posted on The Story's Story:

“Despite being a denizen of the digital world, or maybe because he knew too well its isolating potential, Jobs was a strong believer in face-to-face meetings.” That’s from Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs. It’s a strange way to begin a post about notebooks, but Jobs’ views on the power of a potentially anachronistic practice applies to other seemingly anachronistic practices. I’m a believer in notebooks, though I’m hardly a luddite and use a computer too much.

The notebook has an immediate tactile advantage over phones: they aren’t connected to the Internet. It’s intimate in a way computers aren’t. A notebook has never interrupted me with a screen that says, “Wuz up?” Notebooks are easy to use without thinking. I know where I have everything I’ve written on-the-go over the last eight years: in the same stack. It’s easy to draw on paper. I don’t have to manage files…

View original 1,534 more words

Growing Up Seventh-Day Adventist: Being a “Preacher’s Kid”

Originally posted on Sam's Online Journal:

I was in the unenviable position of having a father who was a traveling minister (he still is). This meant that he was away for long stretches of time, on the road, traveling, going to church after church, in conference after conference, spending so much time away from his family. Don’t think I didn’t notice, dad. But that’s just the way it was, and he is quite an inspirational speaker, don’t get me wrong. I’ve seen his process, how he goes about preparing sermons, and it’s a wonder to behold. I’ve also seen those same sermons delivered, in churches, in tents, in prisons, and in fields and pavilions throughout this country, and it’s also something special. But being him, and being his son are two completely different things, something too many people failed to remember.

When I would travel with my dad, which happened more and more as I got…

View original 456 more words

Growing Up Seventh-Day Adventist: Being a “Preacher’s Kid”

Originally posted on Sam's Online Journal:

I was in the unenviable position of having a father who was a traveling minister (he still is). This meant that he was away for long stretches of time, on the road, traveling, going to church after church, in conference after conference, spending so much time away from his family. Don’t think I didn’t notice, dad. But that’s just the way it was, and he is quite an inspirational speaker, don’t get me wrong. I’ve seen his process, how he goes about preparing sermons, and it’s a wonder to behold. I’ve also seen those same sermons delivered, in churches, in tents, in prisons, and in fields and pavilions throughout this country, and it’s also something special. But being him, and being his son are two completely different things, something too many people failed to remember.

When I would travel with my dad, which happened more and more as I got…

View original 456 more words

Agency is Agency, No Matter What It Wears

Originally posted on Smoke & Stir:

By Taylor Marvin

At The American Prospect E.J, Graff has a thought-provoking piece on rape culture in the US and abroad. If Americans are tempted to view the horrific torture, rape, and murder of a New Delhi woman as evidence that rape culture is endemic only to foreign societies, they’re wrong; in Graff’s words, rape culture “lives anywhere that has a ‘traditional’ vision of women’s sexuality.” This, of course, includes the US, where slut-shaming is epidemic, politicians restrict their sympathy for survivors of “legitimate” rape, and all too many people continue to blame rape survivors for being the victim of crimes.

Graff makes her argument in graphic detail, and her piece is well worth reading. However, one troubling line jumps out:

“A culture in which women must cover up or be threatened is a rape culture. You’re thinking of hijab and burquas, right? Think also of the now well-known SlutWalks, which were launched after…

View original 543 more words